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One option would be to skip the spill motion and go directly to a call for candidates for the leadership. It would put the acid on putative challengers and catch them out if they are not ready.

Aerial ping-pong A jocular and frequently derisive name for Australian Rules Football or Aussie Rules as it is popularly called. The term derives from the fact that the play in this game is characterised by frequent exchanges of long and high kicks.

The term is used largely by people from States in which Rugby League and not Aussie Rules is the major football code. This interstate and code rivalry is often found in evidence for the term, including the early evidence from the s.

In he enlisted in the A. Dunn, How to Play Football: Sydneysiders like to call Australian Rules 'aerial ping-pong'. A team from Sydney was admitted to the national competition inand one from Brisbane was admitted in These teams are based in traditional Rugby League areas, yet have drawn very large crowds, and have been very successful.

While the term is perhaps not as common as it once was there is still evidence from more recent years. Without a shadow of a doubt the aerial ping pong boys have league beaten when it comes to WAGs. It is a significant feature of rural Australia, of politicians especially urban-based politicians travelling in the outback, and of expatriates who wish to emphasis their Australianness. Now a proprietary name, our earliest evidence comes from an advertisement.

Yes, the smartest hat that's made in our own country may be seen in our hat department In later use chiefly as ambit claim. In Australian English an ambit claim is one typically made by employees which sets the boundaries of an industrial dispute. The term is a specific use of ambit meaning 'extent, compass'.

First recorded in the s. In the Commonwealth Arbitration Court. Mr Justice Powers to-day delivered judgment on the point. He said that the ambit of the dispute before the Court was confined to constructional work, but that the Court could and would deal with claims for maintenance work.

This is an abbreviation that follows a very common Australian pattern of word formation, with —o added to the abbreviated form. The -o form is often found at the ending of Australian nicknames, as in Johno, Jacko, and Robbo. Ambo was first recorded in the s. Even though I was a nurse before I became an ambo, at first I thought, can I handle this?

Ant's pants is an Australian variant of the originally US forms bee's knees and cat's whiskers with the same meaning. The term is first recorded in the s. These Men's Pull-overs of ours. They're the Ant's Pants for Value. Parsons Return to Moondilla: Anzac denotes the virtues of courage and determination displayed by the First World War Australian soldiers at Gallipoli in Lord Kitchener told the 'Anzacs' at the Dardanelles how much the King appreciated their splendid services, and added that they had done even better than the King expected.

Anzac biscuit A sweet biscuit typically containing rolled oats and golden syrup. While variations on this classic recipe exist, its simplicity is its hallmark. The association with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps goes back to when the recipe was first recorded.

The biscuits are also known simply as Anzacs. The following quotations show the evolution of the recipe: Beat butter and sugar to cream, add eggs well beaten, lastly flour, rice flour baking powder, cinnamon and spice. Mix to stiff paste, roll and cut into biscuits. Bake a nice light brown in moderate oven. When cold jam together and ice.

Two breakfast-cupfuls of John Bull oats, half a cupful sugar, one scant cupful plain flour, half a cupful melted butter. Mix one table-spoonful golden syrup, two table-spoonfuls boiling water, and one teaspoon-ful bicarbonate of soda, until they froth, then add the melted butter.

Mix in dry ingredients and drop in spoonfuls on greased tray. Bake in a slow oven. Australian English often uses the feminine pronoun she where standard English would use it. She's apples was originally rhyming slang - apple and spice or apple and rice for 'nice'.

The phrase has now lost all connection with its rhyming slang origin. First recorded in the s the term can still be heard today. MacQuarrie We and Baby: It is often used in the phrase this arvo, which is sometimes shortened to sarvo: Arvo is an example of a special feature of Australian English, the habit of adding -o to an abbreviated word.

First recorded in the s and still going strong today. Former Baywatch beach decoration and Playboy bunny Pamela Anderson plans to visit a Gold Coast KFC outlet this arvo to protest against the company's treatment of chooks. The phrase was first recorded in the s. In recent years it has also been used with reference to questions of gender identity, and in this sense it has been exported to other countries. Players were all over the place like Brown's cows, and most didn't know whether they were Arthur or Martha.

Years ago, I teamed my work outfits Kookai tube skirts, fang-collared blouses with my dad's ties, only to be informed by my manager I looked as though I wasn't sure if I was Arthur or Martha.

The abbreviation Aussie is a typical example of the way Australians abbreviate words and then add the -ie or -y suffix. Other common examples includes budgie a budgerigarrellie a relativeand tradie a tradesperson. The word is used as a noun to refer to the country and to a person born or residing in the country, and as an adjective denoting something relating to Australia.

Aussie is also used as an abbreviation for 'Australian English' and the 'Australian dollar'. The earliest evidence for Aussie occurs in the context of the First World War. Moberly Experiences 'Dinki Di' R. A farewell dance for the boys going home to 'Aussie' tomorrow.

One of our Aussie officers. From the early sixteenth century, European philosophers and mapmakers assumed a great southern continent existed south of Asia. They called this hypothetical place Terra Australis, Latin for 'southern land'. The first European contact with Australia was in the early seventeenth century, when Dutch explorers touched on parts of the Australian continent. As a result of their explorations, that part of the mainland lying west of the meridian which passes through Torres Strait was named Nova Hollandia Latin for 'New Holland'.

Cook entered the word Astralia misspelt thus in his journal the following August. However he did so only in reference to an earlier seeker of the southern land, the Portuguese-born navigator Pedro Fernandez de Quiros, who in had named the New Hebrides Austrialis de Spiritu Santo. The Islands discover'd by Quiros call'd by him Astralia del Espiritu Santo lays in this parallel but how far to the East is hard to say.

Cook himself called the new continent New Holland, a name that acknowledges the early Dutch exploration; the eastern coast he claimed for Britain and called New South Wales.

The first written record of Australia an anglicised form of Terra Australis as a name for the known continent did not occur until George Shaw in his Zoology of New Holland refers to: It was Matthew Flinders, English navigator and the first person to circumnavigate and map Australia's coastlinewho first expressed a strong preference for the name Australia.

He gave his reasons in It is necessary, however, to geographical propriety, that the whole body of land should be designated under one general name; on this account, and under the circumstances of the discovery of the different parts, it seems best to refer back to the original Terra Australis, or Australia; which being descriptive of its situation, having antiquity to recommend it, and no reference to either of the two claiming nations, is perhaps the least objectionable that could have been chosen; for it is little to apprehended, that any considerable body of land, in a more southern situation, will be hereafter discovered.

To these geographical, historical and political reasons for preferring the name, he adds in his account of his voyages that Australia is 'agreeable to the ear, and an assimilation to the names of the other great portions of the earth'. Australia was championed too by Lachlan Macquarie, Governor of New South Wales fromwho was aware of Flinders' preference and popularised the name by using it in official dispatches to London.

He writes in of: With Macquarie's kickstart Australia eventually proved to be the popular choice. Although the name New Holland continued alongside it for some time, by William Westgarth noted that 'the old term New Holland may now be regarded as supplanted by that happier and fitter one of Australia'. B banana bender A Queenslander. The term derives from the joking notion as perceived from the southern states of Australia that Queenslanders spend their time putting bends into bananas.

An article from 15 July in the Queenslander provides a forerunner to the term when a man is asked by the Queen what his occupation is: Further to enlighten her Majesty he explained that bananas grew straight on the trees, and so just before they ripened, his was the job to mount the ladder, and with a specialised twist of the wrist, put into the fruit the Grecian bend that was half its charm.

The association of bananas with Queensland 'banana land' is based on the extensive banana-growing industry in tropical Queensland. The Queensland border has been called the Banana curtain and Brisbane has been called Banana city. Banana bender, in reference to a Queenslander, is first recorded in and is till commonly heard. Lockwood Up the Track: We are so close to Queensland that I think we should hop over the border. What do you say to a quick look at the banana-benders?

Should the Matilda's [sic] have won last night or the Netball Diamonds see off New Zealand, Anna Bligh will doubtless claim it was due to the preponderance of banana benders in the squads or at the very least the result of a Gold Coast holiday during their formative years.

In David Collins writes of the 'bones of small animals, such as opossums From s the word bandicoot has been used in various distinctively Australian phrases as an emblem of deprivation or desolation. Watson in Lecture on South Australia writes: It means 'to remove potatoes from the ground, leaving the tops undisturbed'. Usually this activity is surreptitious. I must 'bandicoot' spuds from the cockies - Or go on the track!

The bandicooter goes at night to a field of ripe potatoes and carefully extracts the tubers from the roots without disturbing the tops. Bandicoots are small marsupials with long faces, and have been given a role in Australian English in similes that suggest unhappiness or some kind of deprivation see above. The expression miserable as a bandicoot was first recorded in the s. On her arrival here she found him living with another woman by whom he had several children, and from whom he was necessarily obliged to part, not, however, without very candidly forewarning his wife, the present complainant, that he would make her as miserable as a bandicoot.

I am as miserable as a bandicoot having to sneak home like this. Banksia is the name of an Australian genus of shrubs and trees with about 60 species. It was named after the botanist Sir Joseph Banks, who was on the Endeavour with James Cook on his voyage of discovery in After flowering, many banksias form thick woody cones, often in strange shapes. It was on such grotesque shapes that May Gibbs modelled her banksia men in Snugglepot and Cuddlepie of Snake and the bushy heads of the bad Banksia men'.

Prichard Bid me to Love: See what I've got in my pocket for you Smith Saddle in the Kitchen: Hell was under the well near the cow paddock, deep and murky and peopled by gnarled and knobby banksia men who lurked there waiting for the unguarded to fall in.

The term derives from the notion that a topic is so interesting that it could halt proceedings at a barbecue - and anything that could interrupt an Aussie barbecue would have to be very significant indeed! The term was coined by Australian prime minister John Howard in in the context of balancing work pressures with family responsibilities. Barbecue stopper is now used in a wide range of contexts. For an earlier discussion of the term see our Word of the Month article from August Controlled crying is a guaranteed barbecue stopper among Australian parents, more divisive than the old breast-versus-bottle feeding debate.

Planning and zoning looms as a barbecue stopper in leafy suburbs, where many residents and traders will defend to the last breath their quiet enjoyment and captive markets. Barcoo The name of the Barcoo River in western Queensland has been used since the s as a shorthand reference for the hardships, privations, and living conditions of the outback.

Poor diets were common in remote areas, with little access to fresh vegetables or fruit, and as a result diseases caused by dietary deficiencies, such Barcoo rot—a form of scurvy characterised by chronic sores—were common. Katharine Susannah Prichard writes in The great sores festered on his back, hands and legs: Another illness probably caused by poor diet was Barcoo sickness also called Barcoo vomit, Barcoo spew, or just Barcooa condition characterised by vomiting.

Happily, Barcoo can also denote more positive aspects of outback life: Barcoo can also typify the laconic bush wit. Patsy Adam Smith relates the following story: Some claim barrack comes from Australian pidgin to poke borak at 'to deride', but its origin is probably from Northern Irish barrack 'to brag; to be boastful'.

By itself barrack meant 'to jeer' and still does in British Englishbut the form barrack for transformed the jeering into cheering in Australian English.

Old dad was in his glory there - it gave the old man joy To fight a passage thro' the crowd and barrack for his boy. I take it you'll be barracking for Labor tonight? He thought it was about time to take the pledge and officially become Australian as he had barracked for our cricket team since In horseracing the barrier is a starting gate at the racecourse.

The word barrier is found in a number of horseracing terms in Australian English including barrier blanket a heavy blanket placed over the flanks of a racehorse to calm it when entering a barrier stall at the start of a racebarrier trial a practice race for young, inexperienced, or resuming racehorsesand barrier rogue a racehorse that regularly misbehaves when being placed into a starting gate.

Barrier rise is first recorded in the s. For a more detailed discussion of this term see our Word of the Month article from October Wilson's colt Merman, who, like Hova, was comparatively friendless at barrier rise. The talented Norman-trained trotter Tsonga, also driven by Jack, speared across the face of the field at barrier rise from outside the front row in the mobile - and from then was never headed.

The word is a borrowing from French in the Middle English period, and meant, literally, 'a person who battles or fights', and figuratively 'a person who fights against the odds or does not give up easily'. The corresponding English word was feohtan which gives us modern English 'to fight'.

English also borrowed the word war from the French in the twelfth century; it's the same word as modern French guerre. But the word battler, at the end of the nineteenth century, starts to acquire some distinctively Australian connotations. For this reason, it gets a guernsey in the Australian National Dictionary.

It describes the person with few natural advantages, who works doggedly and with little reward, who struggles for a livelihood and who displays courage in so doing.

Our first citation for this, not surprisingly, comes from Henry Lawson in While the Billy Boils In Kylie Tennant writes: In this tradition, K. Smith writes in Roughly speaking, there are three kinds of people in this country: In the 21st century the term has been used in various political contests as this quotation in the Australian from 1 July demonstrates: It has also been used of an unemployed or irregularly employed person. This sense is first recorded in the Bulletin in Almost everyone I met blamed the unfortunate "battler", and I put it down to some of the Sydney "talent" until I caught two Chows vigorously destroying melon-vines'.

Again in the Bulletin in we find: Frank Hardy in Tales of Billy Yorker writes: Weller, Bastards I have met writes: A person who frequents racecourses in search of a living, esp.

The word is used in Australia with this sense from the end of the nineteenth century. Cornelius Crowe in his Australian Slang Dictionary gives: Wright in The Boy from Bullarah notes: In we find in the Bulletin: A battler is the feminine'. Chandler in Darkest Adelaide c. This is still the person of the Henry Lawson tradition, who, 'with few natural advantages, works doggedly and with little reward, struggles for a livelihood and displays courage in so doing '.

But perhaps the battler of contemporary Australia is more likely to be paying down a large mortgage rather than working hard to put food on the table! Anglers use a variety of baits for berley, such as bread, or fish heads and guts.

Poultry mash and tinned cat food make more unusual berleying material, although this pales beside a Bulletin article in suggesting 'a kerosene-tinful of rabbit carcasses boiled to a pulp' as the best berley for Murray cod.

The first evidence for the noun occurs in the s. The origin of the word is unknown. In pre-decimal currency days the larger the denomination, the bigger the banknote. Big-noting arose from the connection between flashing large sums of money about and showing off. There was no suggestion that Coates had the revolver for any sinister purpose. He had admitted producing it to 'big note' himself in the eyes of the young woman and her parents. Foster Man of Letters: He's never been one to big-note himself.

Bikie follows a very common pattern in Australian English by incorporating the -ie or -y suffix. This suffix works as an informal marker in the language. In early use bikie often referred to any member of a motorcycle motorbike gang or club - often associated with youth culture.

In more recent times the term is often associated with gangs of motorcylists operating on the fringes of legality. Bikie is first recorded in the s.

For a more detailied discussion of the term see our Word of the Month article from March Bikie, a member of a gang or a club of people interested in motor bikes. We need to stop romanticising the notion that bikies are basically good blokes in leather vests.

Some bikies procure, distribute and sell drugs through their 'associates', who in turn sell them to kids. The word is a borrowing from Yuwaalaraay an Aboriginal language of northern New South Wales and neighbouring languages. The bilby is also known as dalgyte in Western Australia and pinky in South Australia.

Since the early s there have been attempts to replace the Easter bunny with the Easter bilby. At Easter it is now possible to buy chocolate bilbies. Bilby is first recorded in the s. There is also all over this part of the country a small animal which burrows in the ground like a rabbit: Mining activity can also cause direct and indirect disturbance to sites inhabited by bilbies.

Billabongs are often formed when floodwaters recede. At the end of a very long waterhole, it breaks into billibongs, which continue splitting into sandy channels until they are all lost in the earthy soil. It will soon offer more activities including fishing at a nearby billabong once the area is declared croc-free.

It is not, as popularly thought, related to the Aboriginal word billabong. Billy is first recorded in the s. A 'billy' is a tin vessel, something between a saucepan and a kettle, always black outside from being constantly on the fire, and looking brown inside from the quantity of tea that is generally to be seen in it. The green ants, we learn later, are a form of bush medicine that others choose to consume by boiling the nest in a billy and drinking the strained and distilled contents.

Billycart is a shortened form of the Australian term billy-goat cart which dates back to the s. In earlier times the term applied to a small cart, often two-wheeled, that was pulled by a goat. These billycarts were used for such purposes as home deliveries, and they were also used in races. The term was then applied to any homemade go-cart. Billycart is recorded in the first decade of the 20th century. As boys, Fred and I delivered books round Sydney in a billycart.

Bits of busted billycarts and boxes litter the place beneath the sagging clothesline. Bindi-eye is oftened shortened to bindi, and can be spelt in several ways including bindy-eye and bindii. Bindi-eye is usually considered a weed when found in one's lawn.

Many a child's play has been painfully interrupted by the sharp barbs of the plant which have a habit of sticking into the sole of one's foot. Bindy-eye is first recorded in the s. Fancy him after working a mob of sheep through a patch of Bathurst Burr, or doing a day's work in a paddock where the grass seed was bad and bindy-eyes thick.

You know it's summer when the frangipani flower in their happy colours, when the eucalypt blossom provides a feast for the rosellas - and when the bindi-eyes in your lawn punish you for going barefoot.

Bingle is perhaps from Cornish dialect bing 'a thump or blow'. Most other words derived from Cornish dialect in Australian English were originally related to mining, including fossick. The word is frequently used to refer to a car collision. Bingle is first recorded in the s. There was this clang of metal on metal and both cars lurched over to the shoulder and we nearly went for a bingle.

In fact some of Hughesy and Kate's listeners are laughing so hard they have to pull over in their cars or risk having a bingle on the way back from work. A dog or other animal which is made up of a bit of this and a bit of that. This meaning is common today, but when bitser first appeared in the s it referred to any contraption or vehicle that was made of spare parts, or had odd bits and pieces added. The small girl pondered. My friends call him a "bitzer"', she replied.

We had lots of cats and dogs. My favourite was a bitser named Sheila. Anywhere beyond the black stump is beyond civilisation, deep in the outback, whereas something this side of the black stump belongs to the known world. Although the towns of Blackall, Coolah and Merriwagga each claim to possess the original black stump, a single stump is unlikely to be the origin of this term. It is more probable that the burnt and blackened tree stumps, ubiquitous in the outback, and used as markers when giving directions to travellers is the origin - this sense of black stump is recorded from The mistake in the past has been the piecemeal and patchwork nature of our public works policy.

Tracks have been made, commencing nowhere and ending the same, roads have been constructed haphazard, bridges have been built that had no roads leading either to or from them, railways have terminated at the proverbial black stump. Wynnum I'm Jack, all Right: It's way back o' Bourke. Beyond the Black Stump. Not shown on the petrol station maps, even. Our own wine writer, Huon Hooke, doesn't know the wine but suspects it comes from a region between Bandywallop and the Black Stump.

Blind Freddy A very unperceptive person; such a person as a type. This term often appears in the phrase even blind Freddy could see that. Although the term may not derive from an actual person, early commentators associate it with a blind Sydney character or characters. Australian lexicographer Sidney Baker wrote in that 'Legend has it that there was a blind hawker in Sydney in the s, named Freddy, whose blindness did not prevent his moving freely about the central city area'.

Other commentators suggest a character who frequented various Sydney sporting venues in the first decades of the 20th century could be the original Freddy. The term itself is first recorded in Billy Farnsworth and [Chris] McKivatt seem to suit one another down to the ground as a pair of halves, but then Blind Freddie couldn't help taking Chris's passes.

Scourfield As the River Runs: Blind Freddie could see Emerald Gorge is a natural dam site. It applied to a person of great heart, who displayed courage, loyalty, and mateship. This verb derives from the noun blouse meaning 'the silk jacket worn by a jockey'. As the origin of this word would indicate, much of the evidence is from the sport of horseracing.

For a detailed discussion of blouse see our Word of the Month article from November Four years ago at this ground - Mark Taylor's last one-day appearance for Australia - England smashed to blouse Australia on a typically good batting strip. The Meryl Hayley-trained speedster, chasing four wins in a line, was bloused in a thrilling finish by Cut Snake with a further head to third placegetter, Danreign. The word is ultimately a shortening of bludgeoner. A bludgeoner not surprisingly was a person who carried a bludgeon 'a short stout stick or club'.

It appears in a mid-nineteenth century English slang dictionary as a term for 'a low thief, who does not hesitate to use violence'. Time for the quiet rustle of leaf-laden trees that screen out the moon. And underneath it all, behind the eyes of the men, hanging invisible over the summer night, is a horror without words. For this is the stillness before storm. This is the eve of the end. Behind a tiny ship heading into space is a doomed planet on the verge of suicide.

Ahead lies a place called Earth, the third planet from the sun. And for William Sturka and the men and women with him, it's the eve of the beginning in the Twilight Zone. I Shot an Arrow into the Air [1. Her name is the Arrow One. She represents four-and-a-half years of planning, preparation and training, and a thousand years of science and mathematics and the projected dreams and hopes of not only a nation, but a world.

She is the first manned aircraft into space. And this is the countdown - the last five seconds before man shot an arrow into the air. Now you make tracks, Mr.

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You move out and up like some kind of ghostly Billy club was tapping at your ankle and telling you that it was later than you think. You scrabble up rock hills and feel hot sand underneath your feet and, every now and then, take a look over your shoulder at a giant sun suspended in a dead and motionless sky like an unblinking eye that probes at the back of your head in a prolonged accusation.

Correy, last remaining member of a doomed crew, keep moving. Push up and push out, because if you stop Maybe realization will pry open your mind and the horror that you left down in the sand will seep in. Correy, yeah, you better keep moving. That's the order of the moment: Practical joke perpetrated by Mother Nature and a combination of improbable events. Practical joke wearing the trappings of nightmare, of terror, of desperation.

Small human drama played out in a desert 97 miles from Reno, Nevada, U. Her name is Nan Adams. She's twenty-seven years old. Her route - fear. Her destination - quite unknown. Nan Adams, age twenty-seven.

She was driving to California, to Los Angeles. She didn't make it. There was a detour through the Twilight Zone. Franklin Gibbs, three days and two nights, all expenses paid, at a Las Vegas hotel, won by virtue of Mrs. Gibbs's knack with a phrase. But unbeknownst to either Mr.

Gibbs is the fact that there's a prize in their package neither expected nor bargained for. In just a moment one of them will succumb to an illness worse than any virus can produce, a most inoperative, deadly, life-shattering affliction known as the fever. Franklin Gibbs, visitor to Las Vegas, who lost his money, his reason, and finally his life to an inanimate metal machine variously described as a one-armed bandit, a slot machine or, in Mr.

Franklin Gibbs's words, a monster with a will all its own. For our purposes we'll stick with the latter definition because we're in the Twilight Zone. The Last Flight [1.

The year is The problem is that the Lieutenant is hopelessly lost. Lieutenant Decker will soon discover that a man can be lost not only in terms of maps and miles, but also in time, and time in this case can be measured in eternities. Dialogue from a play, Hamlet to Horatio: There are more things in heaven and Earth, and in the sky, that perhaps can be dreamt of.

And somewhere in between heaven, the sky, the Earth, lies the Twilight Zone. The Purple Testament [1. Army, Philippine Islands, These are the faces of the young men who fight. As if some omniscient painter had mixed a tube of oils that were at one time earth brown, dust gray, blood red, beard black, and fear - yellow white, and these men were the models. For this is the province of combat and these are the faces of war.

From William Shakespeare, Richard the Third, a small excerpt. The line reads, 'He has come to open the purple testament of bleeding war. Lieutenant Fitzgerald has found the Twilight Zone. The time is the day after tomorrow. The cast of characters: And in a moment they'll find home, not a home that is a place to be seen but a strange, unexplainable experience to be felt.

Kirby, Webber, and Meyers, three men lost. They shared a common wish, a simple one, really - they wanted to be aboard their ship, headed for home. And fate, a laughing fate, a practical jokester with a smile that stretched across the stars, saw to it that they got their wish, with just one reservation: Millicent Barnes, age twenty-five, young woman waiting for a bus on a rainy November night.

Not a very imaginative type is Miss Barnes, not given to undue anxiety or fears, or for that matter even the most temporal flights of fancy. Like most young career women, she has a generic classification as a, quote, girl with a head on her shoulders, end of quote. All of which is mentioned now because in just a moment the head on Miss Barnes's shoulders will be put to a test.

Circumstances will assault her sense of reality and a chain of nightmares will put her sanity on a block. Millicent Barnes, who in one minute will wonder is she's going mad. Obscure metaphysical explanation to cover a phenomenon, reasons dredged out of the shadows to explain away that which cannot be explained.

Call it parallel planes or just insanity. Whatever it is, you find it in the Twilight Zone. The Monsters are Due on Maple Street [1. A tree-lined little world of front porch gliders, barbecues, the laughter of children and the bell of an ice cream vendor.

The tools of conquest do not necessarily come with bombs and explosions and fallout. There are weapons that are simply thoughts, attitudes, prejudices For the record, prejudices can kill And the pity of it is A World of Difference [1. You're looking at a tableau of reality, things of substance, of physical material: These things exist and have dimension. Now this is Arthur Curtis, age thirty-six, who also is real.

He has flesh and blood, muscle and mind. But in just a moment we will see how thin a line separates that which we assume to be real with that manufactured inside of a mind. The modus operandi for the departure from life is usually a pine box of such and such dimensions, and this is the ultimate in reality.

But there are other ways for a man to exit from life. Take the case of Arthur Curtis, age thirty-six. His departure was along a highway with an exit sign that reads 'This way to escape. Long Live Walter Jameson [1. You're looking at Act One, Scene One, of a nightmare, one not restricted to witching hours and dark, rainswept nights. Professor Walter Jameson, popular beyond words, who talks of the past as if it were the present, who conjures up the dead as if they were alive. Last stop on a long journey, as yet another human being returns to the vast nothingness that is the beginning You are looking at a species of flimsy little two-legged animal with extremely small heads whose name is Man.

Warren Marcusson, age thirty-five. Hey, come on, Sam. We've only got a few minutes. They're taking a highway into space, Man unshackling himself and sending his tiny, grouping fingers up into the unknown. Their destination is Mars, and in just a moment we'll land there with them. Species of animal brought back alive.

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Interesting similarity in physical characteristics to human beings in head, trunk, arms, legs, hands, feet. Very tiny undeveloped brain.

Comes from primitive planet named Earth. Calls himself Samuel Conrad. And he will remain here in his cage with the running water and the electricity and the central heat as long as he lives. Samuel Conrad has found the Twilight Zone. Commonplace, if somewhat grim, unsocial event known as a necktie party. The guest of dishonor a cowboy named Joe Caswell, just a moment away from a rope, a short dance several feet off the ground, and then the dark eternity of all evil men.

Joe Caswell, who, when the good Lord passed out a conscience, a heart, a feeling for fellow men, must have been out for a beer and missed out. Joe Caswell, in the last quiet moment of a violent life. This is November,the aftermath of a necktie party.

The victim's name - Paul Johnson, a minor-league criminal and the taker of another human life. No comment on his death save this: Retribution is not subject to a calendar. Tonight's case in point in the Twilight Zone.

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The Big Tall Wish [1. In this corner of the universe, a prizefighter named Bolie Jackson, one-handed eighty-three pounds and an hour and a half away from a comeback at St.

Bolie Jackson, who, by the standards of his profession, is an aging, over-the-hill relic of what was and who now sees a reflection of himself who's left too many pieces of his youth in too many stadiums for too many years before too many screaming people. Bolie Jackson, who might do well to look for some gentle magic in the hard-surfaced glass that stares back at him.

Bolie Jackson, a hundred and eighty-three pounds, who left a second chance lying in a heap on a rosin-spattered canvas at St.

Bolie Jackson, who shares the most common ailment of all men, the strange and perverse disinclination to believe in a miracle, the kind of miracle to come from the mind of a little boy, perhaps only to be found in the Twilight Zone. A Nice Place to Visit [1. Portrait of a man at work, the only work he's ever done, the only work he knows.

His name is Henry Francis Valentine but he calls himself Rocky, because that's the way his life has been - rocky and perilous and uphill at a dead run all the way. He's tired now, tired of running or wanting, of waiting for the breaks that come to others but never to him, never to Rocky Valentine. He thinks it's all over now, but he's wrong.

For Rocky Valentine, it's just the beginning. A scared, angry little man who never got a break. Now he has everything he's ever wanted Nightmare as a Child [1.

Month of November, hot chocolate, and a small cameo of a child's face, imperfect only in its solemnity. And these are the improbable ingredients to a human emotion, an emotion, say, like fear. But in a moment this woman, Helen Foley, will realize fear.

She will understand what are the properties of terror. A little girl will lead her by the hand and walk with her into a nightmare. Miss Helen Foley, who has lived in night and who will wake up to morning. Miss Helen Foley, who took a dark spot from the tapestry of her life and rubbed it clean, then stepped back a few paces and got a good look at the Twilight Zone. A Stop at Willoughby [1. This is Gart Williams, age thirty-eight, a man protected by a suit of armor all held together by one bolt.

Just a moment ago, someone removed the bolt, and Mr. Williams's protection fell away from him and left him a naked target. He's been cannonaded this afternoon by all the enemies of his life. His insecurity has shelled him, his sensitivity has straddled him with humiliation, his deep-rooted disquiet about his own worth has zeroed in on him, landed on target, and blown him apart. Gart Williams, ad agency exec, who in just a moment will move into the Twilight Zone - in a desperate search for survival.

Maybe it's wishful thinking nestled in a hidden part of a man's mind, or maybe it's the last stop in the vast design of things, or perhaps, for a man like Mr. Gart Williams, who climbed on a world that went by too fast, it's a place around the bend where he could jump off.

Whatever it is, it comes with sunlight and serenity, and is a part of the Twilight Zone. Not just in love, but madly, passionately, illogically, miserably, all-consumingly in love, with a young woman named Leila who has a vague recollection of his face and even less than a passing interest.

In a moment you'll see a switch, because Mr. Roger Shackleforth, the young gentleman so much in love, will take a short but very meaningful journey into the Twilight Zone.

Roger Shackleforth, who has discovered at this late date that love can be as sticky as a vat of molasses, as unpalatable as a hunk of spoiled yeast, and as all-consuming as a six-alarm fire in a bamboo and canvas tent.

A Passage for Trumpet [1. Joey Crown, musician with an odd, intense face, whose life is a quest for impossible things like flowers in concrete or like trying to pluck a note of music out of the air and put in under glass to treasure. Joey Crown, who makes music, and who discovered something about life; that it can be rich and rewarding and full of beauty, just like the music he played, if a person would only pause to look and to listen.

Joey Crown, who got his clue in the Twilight Zone. In the parlance of the twentieth century, this is an oddball. His name is James B. Bevis, and his tastes lean toward stuffed animals, zither music, professional football, Charles Dickensmoose heads, carnivals, dogs, children, and young ladies. Bevis is accident prone, a little vague, a little discombobulated, with a life that possesses all the security of a floating crap game.

But this can be said of our Mr. Bevis is a fixture in his own private, optimistic, hopeful little world, a world which has long ceased being surprised by him.

Bevis, on whom Dame Fortune will shortly turn her back, but not before she gives him a paste in the mouth. Bevis, just one block away from The Twilight Zone. Bevis, who believes in a magic all his own. The magic of a child's smile, the magic of liking and being liked, the strange and wondrous mysticism that is the simple act of living. Bevis, species of twentieth-century male, who has his own private and special Twilight Zone. Express elevator to the ninth floor of a department store, carrying Miss Marsha White on a most prosaic, ordinary, run-of-the mill errand.

Miss Marsha White on the ninth floor, specialties department, looking for a gold thimble. The odds are that she'll find it, but there are even better odds that she'll find something else, because this isn't just a department store. This happens to be the Twilight Zone. Marsha White in her normal and natural state: But it makes you wonder, doesn't it?

Just how normal are we? Just who are the people we nod our hellos to as we pass on the street? A rather good question to ask, particularly in the Twilight Zone. The Mighty Casey [1. What you're looking at is a ghost, once alive but now deceased. Once upon a time, it was a baseball stadium that housed a major-league ballclub known as the Hoboken Zephyrs. Now it houses nothing but memories and a wind that stirs in the high grass of what was once an outfield, a wind that sometimes bears a faint, ghostly resemblance to the roar of a crowd that once sat here.

We're back in time now, when the Hoboken Zephyrs were still a part of the National League and this mausoleum of memories was an honest-to-Pete stadium. But since this is strictly a story of make-believe, it has to start this way.

Once upon a time, in Hoboken, New Jersey, it was tryout day. Though he's not yet on the field, you're about to meet a most unusual fellow, a left-handed pitcher named Casey. Once upon a time there was a major-league baseball team called the Hoboken Zephyrs who, during the last year of their existence, wound up in last place and shortly thereafter wound up in oblivion. There's a rumor, unsubstantiated of course, that a manager named McGarry took them to the West Coast and wound up with several pennants and a couple of world's championships.

This team had a pitching staff that made history. Of course, none of them smiled very much, but it happens to be a fact that they pitched like nothing human. And if you're interested as to where these gentlemen came from, you might check under 'B' for baseball, in the Twilight Zone. A World of His Own [1. The home of Mr. Gregory West, one of America's most noted playwrights. The office of Mr. Gregory West—shy, quiet, and at the moment, very happy.

We hope you enjoyed tonight's romantic story on the Twilight Zone. At the same time we want you to realize that it was of course purely fictional. In real life such ridiculous nonsense could never- Gregory West: I mean you shouldn't say such things as "nonsense" and "ridiculous". Well, that's the way it goes. Gregory West—Still shy, still quiet, very happy King Nine Will Not Return [2.

This is Africa, War spits out its violence overhead and the sandy graveyard swallows it up. On a hot, still morning she took off from Tunisia to bomb the southern tip of Italy.

An errant piece of flak tore a hole in a wing tank and, like a wounded bird, this is where she landed, not to return on this day, or any other day. Enigma buried in the sand, a question mark with broken wings that lies in silent grace as a marker in a desert shrine. Odd how the real consorts with the shadows, how the present fuses with the past.

How does it happen? The question is on file in the silent desert. The answer is waiting for us in the Twilight Zone. The Man in the Bottle [2. Arthur Castle, gentle and infinitely patient people, whose lives have been a hope chest with a rusty lock and a lost set of keys. But in just a moment that hope chest will be opened, and an improbable phantom will try to bedeck the drabness of these two people's failure-laden lives with the gold and precious stones of fulfillment.

Arthur Castle, standing on the outskirts and about to enter the Twilight Zone. A word to the wise now to the garbage collectors of the world, to the curio seekers, to the antique buffs, to everyone who would try to coax out a miracle from unlikely places.