Banquo and macbeth meet the witches of oz

Macbeth Act 1 Scene 3 | Shakespeare Learning Zone

banquo and macbeth meet the witches of oz

In Act I, scene iii, Macbeth and Banquo go to visit the witches. During this meeting, the prediction that the three witches make about Banquo is that his sons . Macbeth and Banquo with the Witches by Henry Fuseli . He said, "when Macbeth meets with the witches on the heath, it is terrible, because he did revisionist Oz novel Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West ( ). Macbeth and Banquo meet the witches who then give them prophecies. View the genealogy of the family and find images of Witch in Wizard of Oz - Margaret.

Other possible sources, aside from Shakespeare's imagination, include British folklore, such contemporary treatises on witchcraft as King James VI of Scotland 's Daemonologiethe Norns of Norse mythologyand ancient classical myths of the Fates: Productions of Macbeth began incorporating portions of Thomas Middleton 's contemporaneous play The Witch circatwo years after Shakespeare's death.

Shakespeare's witches are prophets who hail Macbeth, the general, early in the play, and predict his ascent to kingship. Upon killing the king and gaining the throne of Scotland, Macbeth hears them ambiguously predict his eventual downfall. The witches, and their "filthy" trappings and supernatural activities, set an ominous tone for the play.

Artists in the eighteenth century, including Henry Fuseli and William Rimmerdepicted the witches variously, as have many directors since. Some have exaggerated or sensationalised the hags, or have adapted them to different cultures, as in Orson Welles 's rendition of the weird sisters as voodoo priestesses.

banquo and macbeth meet the witches of oz

Some film adaptations have cast the witches as such modern analogues as hippies on drugs, or goth schoolgirls. Their influence reaches the literary realm as well in such works as the Discworld and Harry Potter series. Origins Macbeth's Hillock, near Brodie Castle is traditionally identified as the "blasted heath" where Macbeth and Banquo first met the "weird sisters".

The name "weird sisters" is found in most modern editions of Macbeth. However, the First Folio 's text reads: The weyward Sisters, hand in hand, Posters of the Sea and Land In later scenes in the first folio the witches are called "weyward", but never "weird". The modern appellation "weird sisters" derives from Holinshed's original Chronicles. The Wiktionary etymology for "weird" includes this observation: It survived in Scots, whence Shakespeare borrowed it in naming the Weird Sisters, reintroducing it to English.

The senses "abnormal", "strange" etc. In Holinshed, the future King Macbeth of Scotland and his companion Banquo encounter "three women in strange and wild apparell, resembling creatures of elder world" who hail the men with glowing prophecies and then vanish "immediately out of their sight".

Holinshed observes that "the common opinion was that these women were either the Weird Sisters, that is… the goddesses of destiny, or else some nymphs or fairies endued with knowledge of prophecy by their necromantical science. Not only had this trial taken place in Scotland, witches involved confessed to attempt the use of witchcraft to raise a tempest and sabotage the very boat King James and the Queen of Scots were on board during their return trip from Denmark.

This is evidenced by the following passages: The news pamphlet states: Moreover she confessed that at the time when his Majesty was in Denmark, she being accompanied with the parties before specially named, took a Cat and christened it, and afterward bound to each part of that Cat, the cheefest parts of a dead man, and several joints of his body, and that in the night following the said Cat was conveyed into the midst of the sea by all these witches sailing in their riddles or Cues as aforesaid, and so left the said Cat right before the Town of Leith in Scotland: Moreover, they were depicted as more fair than foul both in Holinshed's account and in that of contemporary playgoer Simon Forman.

The prophecies have great impact upon Macbeth.

Pin by Diane Duncan on *THE CRAFT* | Pinterest | Macbeth witches, Witch and Shakespeare

As the audience later learns, he has considered usurping the throne of Scotland. The Witches next appear in what is generally accepted to be a non-Shakespearean scene, 3. Hecate orders the trio to congregate at a forbidding place where Macbeth will seek their art. The meeting ends with a "show" of Banquo and his royal descendants. The Witches then vanish.

banquo and macbeth meet the witches of oz

Analysis The Three Witches represent evil, darkness, chaos, and conflict, while their role is as agents and witnesses. Their presence communicates treason and impending doom.

Macbeth (I,3): Macbeth & Banquo Meet the Witches

During Shakespeare's day, witches were seen as worse than rebels, "the most notorious traitor and rebel that can be". Much of the confusion that springs from them comes from their ability to straddle the play's borders between reality and the supernatural. They are so deeply entrenched in both worlds that it is unclear whether they control fate, or whether they are merely its agents.

They defy logic, not being subject to the rules of the real world. Indeed, the play is filled with situations in which evil is depicted as good, while good is rendered evil. The line "Double, double toil and trouble," often sensationalised to a point that it loses meaningcommunicates the witches' intent clearly: By placing this thought in his mind, they effectively guide him on the path to his own destruction.

This follows the pattern of temptation attributed to the Devil in the contemporary imagination: Macbeth indulges the temptation, while Banquo rejects it. Most of these lines were taken directly from Thomas Middleton 's play The Witch. David Garrick kept these added scenes in his eighteenth-century version. The witches in his play are played by three everyday women who manipulate political events in England through marriage and patronage, and manipulate elections to have Macbeth made Treasurer and Earl of Bath.

The entire play is a commentary on the political corruption and insanity surrounding the period. As with earlier versions, the women are bystanders to the murder of Banquo, as well as Lady Macbeth 's sleepwalking scene. Their role in each of these scenes suggests they were behind Macbeth's fall in a more direct way than Shakespeare's original portrays. The witches encroach further and further into his domain as the play progresses, appearing in the forest in the first scene and in the castle itself by the end.

Directors often have difficulty keeping the witches from being exaggerated and overly-sensational. The production strongly suggests that Lady Macbeth is in league with the witches. One scene shows her leading the three to a firelight incantation. Once Macbeth is King and they are married, however, she abandons him, revealing that she was not Lady Duncan all along, but a witch. The real Lady Duncan appears and denounces Macbeth as a traitor.

After Macbeth's death, the Three Witches reappear in the midst of wind and storm, which they have been associated with throughout the play, to claim his corpse.

banquo and macbeth meet the witches of oz

They carry it to a ravine and shout, "Macbeth! They are wearing elaborate dresses and hairstyles and appear to be noblewomen as Macbeth and Banquo approach. For example, by the eighteenth century, belief in witches had waned in the United Kingdom. Such things were thought to be the simple stories of foreigners, farmers, and superstitious Catholics. However art depicting supernatural subjects was very popular.

In the first thirty-seven lines of the scene, the witches recount to each other the evil deeds in which they have been engaged since their last meeting. It is worth noting that these deeds are petty and vulgar; but just as every good deed — even the giving of a cup of cold water, — is a blessed thing, so every evil deed — even the killing of swine — is a delight to the powers of evil.

This conversation, moreover, serves to identify the "weird sisters" of the play with the familiar witches of Elizabethan superstition.

One of the commonest charges brought against supposed witches in Shakespeare's day was that they maliciously killed by pestilence, or the evil eye, the domestic animals of those they had a grudge against.

The witches lay their fingers on their lips to hush Banquo into silence. Their business is not with him, but with Macbeth; and they will not speak to Banquo until they have discharged their errand.

Three Witches

Witches were generally thought of as bearded women. The witches, like ghosts, will not speak until they are spoken to; but as soon as Macbeth questions them, they break out in their triple hail.

The title "Thane of Glamis" was hereditary in Macbeth's family. See line [73] of this scene. Macbeth starts because the witches' prophecy that he shall be king is an echo of his secret ambition. Indeed it would seem from his wife's words i. The ambiguity of the witches' address to Banquo is in marked contrast to the directness of their speeches to Macbeth. He is to be "lesser than Macbeth" in rank, and "greater," because he will never be the slave of guilt; not so "happy," i.

The prediction that he shall "get," i. According to tradition, the royal house of Stuart sprang from Banquo's son, Fleance. Note the different way in which the sudden vanishing of the witches affects Banquo and Macbeth.